FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Contents

[Questions addressed to William H Kautz, Director of CAI]

Q: How do you define intuition?

A: In simplest terms, intuition is the human capacity for bringing information and knowledge into your mind without the use of rational thinking or reasoning, your five senses or ordinary memory. This is a definition by exclusion, what intuition is not, but it will do for the moment.  Intuition can also be defined by its salient properties and features. Intuition is the mental faculty that underlies many other common but unexplained human behaviors and makes them possible. These include ordinary serendipities, some of greatest scientific breakthroughs, our richest dreams, many mysterious medical diagnoses, psychic phenomena such as telepathy and clairvoyance as studied by parapsychologists and the unusual insights that can occur during near-death experiences. Intuition is the common thread that runs through these examples of anomalous reception of totally new information into the conscious mind without apparent cause. Read on…

Q: Intuition seems like a very flaky and unreliable quirk of mind. Does it really exist as a legitimate human capacity, as you indicate, one we might trust and use intentionally?

A: Yes, intuition is a real human faculty, as legitimate and universal as are those of intelligence, imagination, language and rational thinking. Intuition appears to be unreliable only when it is not developed and used, just like the others. We know it really exists because we all use it daily, though we usually mistakenly credit its results to rational thinking. Less intellectually oriented societies display intuition more openly than do we Westerners. Research in transpersonal psychology and parapsychology have provided abundant and specific evidence that intuition is a natural and universal human capacity. Moreover, it can be intentionally awakened, enhanced and utilized by anyone who wishes to do so. Read on…

Q: How did you get started on your long journey with intuition and its applications?

A: Like almost everyone I was drawn when young to explore new experiences and ideas. As my reasoning mind came into gear I became hesitant from a fear of the consequences that might follow if I probed too deeply into my own mind. But we all take encouragement from others and I was no exception. I know now that we humans learn much more from direct personal experiments and experience than from rational thought, formal education and factual reading. They all play their part, of course, but the interest and willingness to step beyond such intellectual activity is what allows life to move forward.  Read on…

Q: How is that a straight scientist working on the first electronic computers became transplanted into such a subjective domain of research as the study of human intuition?

A: I can tell you the wake-up story about what happened to me at the age of forty-five, while playing the all too familiar role of a happily married family man with four children, employed as a budding engineer/scientist at a leading research institution and blessed with a linear and practical mentality which would not tolerate any irresponsible new-age nonsense. But the truth is, I came into life with a strong desire to understand how knowledge enters the mind, takes root and then moves out into societal effects. I also had a built-in urge to discover my personal identity, who I am, and to participate in Western man’s discovery of his own greater identity, his consciousness. The early years of preparation fit together unknowingly but perfectly into this life scenario. Read on…

Q: What is this organization “CAI” and what did it do?

A: Most of the findings reported on these pages were obtained at the Center for Applied Intuition (CAI), a San Francisco nonprofit organization that functioned actively from 1977 to 1993, then less actively up to the present time while waiting for confirmations of the newly acquired information. CAI conducted exploratory research on intuition and its applications in various specialized areas, in the workplace, in personal development and in relationships. Most of CAI’s programs relied upon a team of about ten “expert intuitives,” individuals who had chosen to develop their natural intuitive abilities into refined and usable skills. Read on…

Q: Who are these expert intuitives whom you say are able to bring forth new, accurate and useful information?

A: They are ordinary individuals by common standards, not especially conspicuous and usually modest about their intuitive abilities. They are distinguished mainly in that they chose to enhance this natural intuitive capacity which we all possess so it could be put it to responsible use. They have much to tell us about their exceptional work, and especially how it benefited their lives and aided others. They also describe that the ability is not a preferential gift but how anyone can do the same if they so choose. Read on…

Q: Suppose I want to develop my intuition into a useful skill. What is involved and how do I begin?

A: Intuition is more learnable than teachable. The task calls more for independent individual “effort” than reading a book, attending a class or receiving instruction from a teacher, though all can help, of course. The only essential requirements are your desire, willingness and intention to explore this usually hidden, inner part of your mind and become intimate with what it has to offer. This is no different than the motivation that inspires one to leave the security of a childhood home and go into business for himself, to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro or to learn how to play the violin. It is an independent decision that comes from inside oneself rather than from an external source or pressure.  Read on…

Q: Is intuitive information always true? How can I know if it’s correct and can be trusted?

A: No, it is not absolutely true, especially when it comes to you through someone else such as an intuitive counselor and no more true than new information arising from any source. Many persons who ought to know know say that intuitive information is inherently true at its source and when first received into the mind, before it is “thought about,” put into words and conveyed to others. This property makes it especially valuable to the intuitive who receives it, which may be oneself, but when it is to be shared it should always be independently verified by some means. Only then can it be trusted to be accurate and applied to a particular purpose. Errors can easily arise as it is passes through the intuitive’s mind into speech, then on to the listener who must interpret it, and eventually to the ultimate user. Verification can sometimes be accomplished by scientific methods, tests or experiments but there is no commonly accepted, universal standard of “truth” by which to judge the accuracy and value of new intuitive information, beyond from the very personal acceptance of it as just mentioned.  Read on…

Q: How was CAI able to apply intuitive inquiry to real-world problems?

A: CAI focussed on ten subject areas for extensive inquiry and possible application. They covered a broad range from practical to theoretical, highly specialized to broad public interest, historical to contemporary and with from short- to long-range significance. In some areas information can be easily verified while in others there can be no hope of ever being confirmed it before it is directly utilized. Practical applications must often wait until verifications can be carried out to render them more credible, and these may be complex and expensive. In five major areas CAI was able to carry out confirmations only 20 to 30 years after they were received. They showed clearly that the method of intuitive inquiry can be highly accurate and useful, whether the information can be externally confirmed or not. Intuitive counseling and commercial consulting could be verified directly by their clients and required no separate verification effort.  Read on…

Q: I’m not so interested in these applications and verifications. Can I not use intuition to enhance my understanding of myself, discover the purpose of my life and learn where I am headed?

A: It certainly can, and this application of intuition appears to be the greatest of all. You are not alone in your search, because capable intuitives have facilitated these personal attempts for thousands of years, in every major culture and still today under various names. The words, practices, rituals and various other means of intuitive access to knowledge have changed many times but the beneficial flow of personal information has always been available when those seeking it are truly ready and ask for it. Even better, you may obtain the answers you want b yourself without tracking down a qualified intuitive advisor. This is always possible because all the resources and knowledge you need for your self-inquiry are already resident in your own mind, readily available to serve you and with rather little effort. Read on…

Q: One thing I know—I don’t want some know-it-all psychic telling me what is right, what I should think and do and what’s going to happen to me next month. Are your expert intuitives any different?

A: They certainly are. No competent and responsible intuitive, including the expert intuitives at CAI, will ever give commands or make unasked for predictions, even if asked. The intuitive’s sole task is to enhance and expand your awareness, your understanding and your potential, never to control or interfere with your choices and your individual process. A qualified intuitive will offer opportunities from which you may choose, and may describe the consequences which may follow whatever choices you make. They will never transgress these choices, your thinking or your future, for which you are fully responsible. Moreover, they will respect your capabilities and limitations and never give you information you cannot handle, any more than loving parents would do to their growing child.  Read on…

Q: Are there any conditions on working with an intuitive if I want to obtain accurate, complete and reliable information?

A: Only that the intuitive should be expert, the questioning should be clear, unambiguous and conforming to CAI’s inquiry protocol, the inquiry should have a positive purpose (not just curiosity or making money) and the consequences of your inquiry should be harmless. The first three are solely under your control. The fourth may involve outcomes you cannot necessarily foresee, so you must be prepared to take the risk that unexpected complications may escape your attention. Read on…

Q. How can it be that such a universal and powerful mental capacity as intuition is not already well recognized and taught in psychology, education and science?

A. The answer lies not in a weakness of intuition but in the barriers set up, mainly by the institution of science, which ignores and devalues subjective processes such as intuition. Science mistakenly associates intuition with superstitions it has struggled for centuries to overcome. This barrier exists despite the important role intuition has played in scientific creativity. Psychology, which has its roots in medical science and psychiatry, acknowledges human subjectivity but only within the limited scope of these established disciplines as they have evolved. Exceptions are transpersonal psychology and parapsychology, in which subfields some progress has been made in recent decades. Read on…

Q: Can intuition be employed to predict the future?

A: Yes, but legitimately only when it does not violate the inquirer’s or another’s freedom of choice or when new information might turn out to be harmful. Most persons seeking predictions do so out of selfish desires, fear, insecurity or to try to manipulate someone through privileged foreknowledge. They are actually personally creating their own futures all of the time and can choose to accept this option or submit to factors outside of themselves. Intuition may be successfully employed for identifying future opportunities to which a person (or a group) may respond, as well as the possible consequences of pursuing them. But no competent intuitive will ever prescribe what must happen to a person as if there were no choice in his response. This guideline also covers predictions of natural events such as earthquakes and the weather, and also the stock market, new technological developments and social and political events, because they include the individual responses to these events as part of the prediction itself. Mundane intuitive predictions such as earthquakes and the stock market were found to be possible and accurate when these conditions are satisfied. Read on…

[updated 12/3/2017]

Last modified: December 10, 2017